Fermenting: Kimchi!

Ingredients

  • 1 Napa cabbage, cut into 2-inch strips
  • ¼ cup kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons minced garlic
  • 2 tablespoons minced ginger
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 3 tablespoons water
  • 4 tablespoons red pepper flakes
  • 1 large daikon radish, peeled and cut into 1-inch matchsticks
  • 2 bunches scallions, cut into 1-inch pieces

·         Step 1: Place cabbage in a large bowl and sprinkle with salt. Mix thoroughly using gloves, if preferred. Place a heavy pot or pan on top with weights and allow cabbage to sit for 1-2 hours until wilted and water has been released.

·         Step 2: Discard water after 1-2 hours. Rinse the cabbage 2-3 times in the sink until salt is removed and allow to drain in a colander for another 15-20 minutes.

·        Step 3: Combine cabbage with remaining ingredients (through water) and mix. Add the red pepper flakes and begin mix.

·         Step 4: Once combined, place mixture in a jar, pressing down and packing tightly so the mixture is submerged in its own liquid. Place lid on jar and allow to sit at room temperature for 2-5 days (you might want to place the jar on a plate, since the mixture may bubble over while fermenting).

·         Step 5: Each day of fermentation, remove the lid to release gases (“burp” the kimchi), and press down on the mixture to keep it submerged. You can taste a sample each day to decide if the level of fermentation is to your liking.

·         Step 6: After 2-5 days of fermentation, store kimchi in the fridge.

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IMG_20180728_093516_1(1)“Kosher” Dill Pickles
Our “kosher” pickles aren’t kosher in the sense that they comply with Jewish food laws. They’re called “kosher” because of the flavor, made popular by New York’s Jewish pickle makers, known for their salt-brined pickles seasoned with garlic and dill. So, any pickle that’s seasoned in the same way is called a “kosher dill.”

Ingredients:

  • 5 tablespoons salt (we used Himalayan)
  • 8 cups water
  • 4-6 horseradish, grape, oak, or bay leaves (we used horseradish)
  • 9 cloves peeled garlic
  • 2 heads dill
  • Optional seasonings: oregano, thyme, black peppercorns, red pepper flakes, mustard seeds, horseradish, etc.
  • Enough pickling cucumbers to fill a ½-gallon jar, cut in coins or spears

Instructions:

  1. Make a brine by dissolving 5 tablespoons salt in 8 cups of water (you might have some extra brine left over when you’re done, which you might want to save for future ferments).
  2. In a half-gallon jar, add the leaves, garlic, dill, and optional seasonings.
  3. Pack the cucumbers tightly on top.
  4. Pour the brine over the pickles, leaving 1-2 inches of headspace. Use a fermentation weight to keep the pickles under the liquid, if necessary (we used horseradish leaves to keep the pickles under the liquid). Cover the jar with a tight lid, or coffee filter secured with a rubber band.
  5. Ferment at room temperature (60-70°F is best) until desired flavor and texture are achieved. If using a tight lid, burp daily to release excess pressure. The brine should turn cloudy and bubbly, and the pickles will taste sour when done (ours were done in a week).
  6. Eat right away, or store in a refrigerator or root cellar for months and enjoy their fermentation benefits all winter long!

 

 

“Pickled” Goodwives – when a tall daughter and short mother try to shoot a 56 second fermenting video!